IDMP Compliance: It’s Key Elements, Requirements & Benefits

Updated December 12th, 2023
IDMP compliance

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Digital transformation is reshaping the pharmaceutical industry, and IDMP compliance sits at its forefront. Navigating the complex terrain of IDMP (Identification of Medicinal Products) standards, developed by ISO, can be daunting, yet it’s a crucial step for businesses in this sector.

With the exponential growth of new drugs and therapies entering the global healthcare market, unambiguous identification and high-quality data on medicinal products is becoming increasingly critical.


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As regulation and safety monitoring becomes more complex in a data-driven world, regulatory agencies like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are recognizing the value of implementing these global IDMP standards.

Let us understand the subject better with the help of this article.


Table of contents

  1. What is IDMP compliance?
  2. 6 key data elements of IDMP
  3. 7 Benefits of IDMP that makes it a success
  4. What is the FDA implementation of IDMP?
  5. What are the IDMP compliance requirements?
  6. Summing up
  7. IDMP compliance: related reads

What is IDMP compliance?

IDMP compliance refers to adhering to a set of standards developed to uniquely identify and describe medicinal products in a consistent manner across regulatory agencies and healthcare systems.

Few key characteristics of IDMP include:

  1. Developed by ISO
  2. Global standard
  3. Regulatory compliance
  4. Ensures data quality
  5. Facilitates information exchange

Let us look at them in detail.

1. Developed by ISO


The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is responsible for creating the IDMP standards. These standards are internationally recognized and provide a comprehensive framework for defining and describing medicinal products.

2. Global standard


IDMP compliance is not limited to a specific country or region. Being a global standard, it aims for uniform identification of medicinal products to facilitate cross-border commerce and regulatory oversight.

3. Regulatory compliance


Being IDMP compliant is often a legal requirement, particularly in the European Union. Non-compliance can result in legal repercussions, including fines and other penalties.

4. Ensures data quality


Adherence to IDMP standards ensures that data related to medicinal products is accurate, consistent, and high-quality. This facilitates better decision-making for healthcare professionals and improves patient safety.

5. Facilitates information exchange


IDMP-compliant data can be easily shared between different organizations and regulatory agencies. This enables smoother information flow, enhancing cooperation and effectiveness in healthcare management.

Understanding and achieving IDMP compliance is crucial for pharmaceutical companies and healthcare providers. It standardizes the way medicinal products are identified and ensures the quality and safety of healthcare data, thereby benefiting both healthcare professionals and patients.


6 Key data elements of IDMP

The Identification of Medicinal Products (IDMP) involves a structured approach to describing medicines. To achieve this, a set of specific data elements is defined to capture crucial information about the medicinal products:

  1. Substance information
  2. Pharmaceutical product information
  3. Medicinal product information
  4. Packaging information
  5. Clinical particulars
  6. Authorization and lifecycle

Let us look at them in detail.

1. Substance information


Substance information captures the details of all active and inactive components in a medicinal product. This includes chemical properties, the concentration of each substance, and its source of origin.

Understanding these elements is crucial for determining a product’s safety, efficacy, and potential interactions with other substances.

2. Pharmaceutical product information


Pharmaceutical product information describes the physical and chemical properties of the drug, such as its form (tablet, syrup) and route of administration (oral, intravenous). This information is essential for healthcare providers to correctly prescribe and administer the medication.

It also outlines storage conditions, like temperature and humidity requirements.

3. Medicinal product information


Medicinal product information encompasses key identifiers like brand name, generic name, and manufacturer. It also details the product’s intended therapeutic use, along with contraindications and warnings. This is a vital reference for both healthcare professionals and consumers to ensure proper usage and safety.

4. Packaging information


Packaging information includes details on the type, size, and material of the packaging. It may also contain barcodes or QR codes for traceability.

Accurate packaging information is essential for logistics, distribution, and ensuring that the product’s integrity is maintained throughout its lifecycle.

5. Clinical particulars


Clinical particulars focus on recommended dosages, side effects, and interactions with other medicines. This information often comes from clinical trials and post-market surveillance.

Accurate clinical details are crucial for healthcare providers to make informed decisions on medication therapy, thereby enhancing patient safety.

6. Authorization and lifecycle


Authorization and lifecycle information provides an overview of the regulatory status of the medicinal product. This includes approval status, licensing numbers, and any subsequent modifications or market withdrawals. This data is crucial for regulatory compliance and provides a historical context for the medication.

Understanding the specific data elements of IDMP is essential for ensuring compliance and high data quality. Each of these elements serves a unique purpose and collectively contribute to forming a comprehensive profile of a medicinal product. Failure to accurately capture this information can result in regulatory repercussions and compromise patient safety.


7 Benefits of IDMP that makes it a success

The Identification of Medicinal Products (IDMP) offers an array of advantages that extend from regulatory compliance to improving patient safety. Embracing IDMP is not just a legal requirement but a strategic move for pharmaceutical companies and healthcare organizations.

  1. Standardized identification
  2. Enhanced data quality
  3. Regulatory compliance
  4. Facilitated data exchange
  5. Improved patient safety
  6. Streamlined operations
  7. Global interoperability

It’s crucial to understand them in detail:

1. Standardized identification


Standardized identification under IDMP creates a uniform framework for naming and describing medicinal products. This eliminates ambiguity and ensures that healthcare providers across different settings are talking about the same medication. It makes prescribing and administering medicines more accurate and efficient.

2. Enhanced data quality


IDMP’s rigorous data requirements ensure that all captured information is accurate, complete, and consistent. High-quality data is crucial for sound decision-making, whether it’s in clinical settings, research, or regulatory evaluations. This directly contributes to better healthcare outcomes.

3. Regulatory compliance


Adherence to IDMP standards is often a legal requirement, particularly in regions like the European Union. Regulatory compliance avoids the risk of legal ramifications, including fines or market withdrawal. It also ensures that a medicinal product meets the quality and safety standards set by authorities.

4. Facilitated data exchange


IDMP compliance allows for easy sharing of data across various stakeholders, such as healthcare providers, regulatory agencies, and even patients. This facilitates a more efficient and effective healthcare system, enabling quick and informed decision-making in patient care.

5. Improved patient safety


By thoroughly capturing all aspects of a medicinal product, IDMP reduces the risk of medication errors and adverse drug reactions. This is particularly vital in settings where multiple medications might be prescribed, helping healthcare providers to avoid harmful drug interactions and improve patient safety.

6. Streamlined operations


With IDMP, data is organized in a standard format, making it easier to integrate different systems from Electronic Health Records to pharmaceutical supply chains. Streamlined operations lead to cost savings, efficiency gains, and overall better management of healthcare services.

7. Global interoperability


IDMP is a globally accepted standard, facilitating seamless cross-border exchange of medicinal product information. For multinational companies or international collaborations, this means easier compliance with various regional regulations and more efficient global operations.

The benefits of IDMP compliance extend beyond mere regulatory adherence. By standardizing data and facilitating information exchange, IDMP contributes significantly to improving healthcare outcomes and operational efficiencies. Therefore, adopting IDMP is not just about compliance; it’s about enhancing the quality and safety of healthcare worldwide.


What is the FDA implementation of IDMP?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is actively involved in the implementation of the Identification of Medicinal Products (IDMP) standards. While the European Union has been at the forefront of IDMP adoption, the FDA is making strides to integrate these standards into its regulatory framework.

  1. SPL submission
  2. UDI integration
  3. Phased approach
  4. Collaboration with EMA
  5. Data Harmonization

Let us understand these points in detail:

1. SPL submission


Structured Product Labeling (SPL) is a document that pharmaceutical companies are required to submit to the FDA. It includes detailed information about the product, including its use, dosage, and ingredients. The FDA is in the process of aligning these SPL submissions with IDMP standards to improve the quality of data.

This alignment ensures that the data submitted will be consistent, accurate, and easily comparable across different medicinal products. It also simplifies the process for manufacturers who need to submit information to multiple regulatory agencies, making the data more globally applicable.

2. UDI integration


The Unique Device Identification (UDI) system is an FDA initiative aimed at labelling medical devices uniquely for better traceability and patient safety. The FDA is looking to integrate UDI with IDMP to create a more seamless system of identification for both medicinal products and medical devices.

This would help in interoperability, making it easier for healthcare systems to manage and trace both categories of healthcare products. It also assists in more accurate adverse event reporting, as both medications and devices would be under a similar identification schema.

3. Phased approach


The FDA is planning to implement IDMP in a phased manner. A phased approach allows for a more gradual introduction of these complex standards, giving stakeholders ample time to adjust. It also allows the FDA to test and refine the system as it’s being implemented, addressing issues as they arise.

Each phase would target specific areas, like SPL alignment or UDI integration, and would be rolled out after careful assessment. This staggered implementation helps to ensure a smoother transition, reducing the risk of disruption to ongoing healthcare services.

4. Collaboration with EMA


The FDA frequently collaborates with the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for mutual recognition and data harmonization. As EMA has been at the forefront of IDMP implementation, such collaboration allows the FDA to leverage the learnings and best practices from the European experience.

This is beneficial for global pharmaceutical companies that have to comply with multiple regulatory frameworks. Joint initiatives could streamline the submission process and ensure greater consistency in the data collected, thereby promoting global alignment in healthcare data standards.

5. Data harmonization


Data harmonization aims to bring consistency to the different databases and systems that house medicinal product information. Implementing IDMP at the FDA would mean aligning various internal databases so that they speak the same ‘data language.‘

This would facilitate easier data exchange and sharing among different U.S. health agencies, healthcare providers, and even global partners. It enables more robust data analytics and real-world evidence generation, improving the FDA’s ability to monitor product safety, make informed regulatory decisions, and collaborate internationally.

The FDA’s implementation of IDMP is a significant milestone in standardizing and improving the quality of medicinal product information in the United States. By aligning with global standards, the FDA aims not only to enhance domestic healthcare but also to contribute to global healthcare data harmonization and patient safety.


What are the IDMP compliance requirements?

Identity Management and Data Protection (IDMP) compliance is an essential aspect for organizations in the modern digital landscape. The primary focus of IDMP compliance is to ensure the security, integrity, and confidentiality of identity data and personal information managed by organizations. Here are the key requirements for IDMP compliance:

  1. Data protection and privacy
  2. Identity verification and authentication
  3. Access management
  4. Audit and compliance reporting
  5. Incident response and notification
  6. Regular training and awareness
  7. Vendor management
  8. Continous improvement

Let’s look at them in detail:

1. Data protection and privacy


Organizations must protect personal data from unauthorized access, disclosure, alteration, and destruction. This involves implementing robust encryption methods, access controls, and privacy policies in line with regulations like GDPR, HIPAA, or others relevant to the organization’s location and industry.

2. Identity verification and authentication


Proper verification mechanisms should be in place to authenticate identities. This may include multi-factor authentication (MFA), biometric verification, or strong password policies. The goal is to ensure that only authorized individuals can access sensitive information or systems.

3. Access management


Access to data and systems should be strictly controlled and monitored. Roles and permissions should be clearly defined, ensuring that individuals have access only to the information necessary for their role.

4. Audit and compliance reporting


Regular audits should be conducted to assess compliance with IDMP standards. Organizations need to maintain logs and records of access and activities related to identity data, which are crucial for compliance reporting and in case of any security breaches.

5. Incident response and notification


There should be a well-defined incident response plan for identity data breaches. This includes mechanisms for quickly identifying and mitigating breaches, as well as notifying affected parties and regulatory bodies as required by law.

6. Regular training and awareness


Employees should be regularly trained on IDMP policies and best practices. Awareness about phishing attacks, password security, and other potential vulnerabilities is crucial for maintaining the integrity of identity data.

7. Vendor management


If third-party vendors have access to identity data, they must also comply with IDMP standards. Organizations are responsible for ensuring that their vendors adhere to the same data protection and privacy standards.

8. Continuous improvement


IDMP compliance is not a one-time effort. Organizations must continuously evaluate and improve their identity management and data protection practices to keep up with evolving threats and regulatory changes.

In summary, IDMP compliance requires a comprehensive approach to securing identity and personal data. It involves technical measures, policies, training, and ongoing vigilance to protect against unauthorized access and data breaches.

Compliance not only protects the organization from legal and financial repercussions but also builds trust with customers and stakeholders by demonstrating a commitment to data security and privacy.


Summing up

While adoption of these complex standards does present challenges, the FDA is taking a phased approach focused on high-impact areas like submissions and device integration.

Overall, IDMP holds great promise to advance regulatory collaboration worldwide, streamline healthcare processes and empower data-driven insights for better therapeutic outcomes. The FDA’s progress in aligning with these global standards demonstrates their leadership in promoting healthcare excellence both nationally and internationally.



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